Welcome to the bloggy home of Noah Brier. I'm the co-founder of Percolate and general internet tinkerer. This site is about media, culture, technology, and randomness. It's been around since 2004 (I'm pretty sure). Feel free to get in touch. Get in touch.

You can subscribe to this site via RSS (the humanity!) or .

Super Bowl Ads Work

This is for everyone that says Super Bowl ads don’t work. From Pando Daily’s article on GoDaddy:

Those ads unquestionably worked. They ran the first one in 2004, with no idea if it’d be brilliant or a colossal waste of money. But the company was paying for it out of cash flow, not venture capital, so why not? Go Daddy had 16 percent marketshare at that point, and the week after the ad, it jumped to 25 percent — and stayed there until the next year. The next Super Bowl ad got it to 28 percent share and the next one got it to 32 percent share. Even when one of the racy ads was preempted by the station, the numbers just kept growing.

I’ve always suspected this, but never had the numbers.

May 14, 2012 // This post is about: , ,

Comments

  • Jimmy says:

    Wonder how many don’t really make that much of an impact thought. A lot of the commercials are from much more well known companies so are they really worth the money? They are basically expected at this point from Budweiser, Car companies etc.. And a good majority of the time you can’t even remember what the ad was for a few days later…

    Undoubtably I think it has helped GoDaddy though. How many other domain name registrars or hosting companies can an average person name off the top of their head, probably none. So in a market where no one has much of an idea, and the product is identical, getting your name out there would be the primary way to increase your sales, and what bigger stage than the Super Bowl.

  • Who Spent $3.8 Million Well? – Drake Cooper says:

    [...] “Those ads unquestionably worked. They ran the first one in 2004, with no idea if it’d be brilliant or a colossal waste of money. But the company was paying for it out of cash flow, not venture capital, so why not? Go Daddy had 16 percent marketshare at that point, and the week after the ad, it jumped to 25 percent — and stayed there until the next year. The next Super Bowl ad got it to 28 percent share and the next one got it to 32 percent share. Even when one of the racy ads was preempted by the station, the numbers just kept growing.” [...]

  • Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Don't sweat it.